Walking Tours

NYC Must Have iPhone Art App – cultureNOW: Guidebook for Museums Without Walls

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cultureNOW: Guidebook for Museums Without Walls

App icon for cultureNOW-Guidebook for Museums Without WallsRated Four StarsIf you live in New York City, have an iPhone and an appreciation for art or a curiosity about NYC history then the cultureNOW: Guidebook for the Museums Without Walls is a must have app. Even if you don’t live in NYC this is an enjoyable app to explore as a virtual visitor.  For your $1.99 you get mobile access to a database of literally thousands of public works of art and architecture (4000+ in Manhattan alone!!). One of the real strengths of this app is the numerous ways the user can explore this vast wealth of content. If you are in the city you can search by location using the iPhone’s GPS. Planning to visit NYC or curious about a specific area then you can choose to enter an address.  The user can also search the entire cultureNOW database by the name of a work of art, a building, by artist, by architect, and even projects such as Arts for Transit and Percent for Art. Screenshot of Search Results for "Arts for Transit"The cultureNOW folks have “mapped any artwork paid for a public agency or visible from a public space” and this app makes it all so conveniently accessible. In yet another way this app is user friendly the handy “Prefs” icon allows the user to set over 20 search categories as on or off.  If you want to focus on only the historic buildings near a specific location this app makes it easy to do that. And the handy “Prefs” icon makes it easy to change to explore in a whole different direction when you choose.

Another way to explore the content on this app is to select “Podcasts” from the main menu and then choose from a selection of “Art”, “Architecture”, “Civic”, “Harlem”, “History”, “Neighborhood”, and “Parks” podcasts.  The range of authentic voices narrating the over 200 podcasts is part of the richness of this app. You hear from artists such as Franco Gaskin, “the Picasso of Harlem”; muralist Richard HaasJean Parker Phifer, author of Public Art New YorkAdrian Benepe, NYC Commissioner of the Department of Parks and Recreation;  Christine Haughney, Frontiers beat reporter for the New York Times, and actor and New York City native Matthew Broderick among a wealth of other voices. One design element of note with the podcasts which I like is a floating screen to play and pause the recording.  As the user listens to the podcast he or she can navigate around the related images, read text about the work of art or building on a different screen, biographical information about the podcast narrator, review the map and all while the audio continues.  Screenshot of Search CategoriesThe users can even continue exploring other works of art while listening to the continuing audio from the selected podcast (a very user-centric feature). Wherever your eyes take you as you listen to the podcast there is a handy “audio” icon in the lower right which allows  you to stop and start the audio without having to return to place in the app where you originally selected the podcast (although I do miss the presence of a slider control on the audio, particularly given that the length of some of the podcasts are over ten minutes).

With all this content to explore where do you start?  Well you might consider starting with one of the suggested tours.  cultureNOW has put together twelve tours including “Cultural and Historical 125th Street”, “Around Manhattan by Bike or Boat Tour”, “Great Crash of 1929: Tour of the Financial District” and one that I can’t wait to explore, though I might have to do so in stages, “Broadway Tip-to-Tail: A Walking Tour From the Bronx to Battery Park” with over forty stops. Or after selecting to search by “artist or architect” and typing in “Arts for Transit” one might spend an afternoon exploring the art in the metro stations. Once you download this app and start exploring you are certain to be inspired and may have trouble putting it down.

Featurewise this app is only missing a couple of things.  It would be nice to be able to save searches and to flag selected items as favorites or with other tags to facilitate the user being able to set up customized treks.  However, Abby Suckle, President of cultureNOW, indicates that we may see such things in future updates.  For the virtual visitor it would also be nice to be able to zoom in on images but given that the user is accessing on demand a database of over 10,000 photos its a fair trade-off in user experience for these images to be optimized for speed.  Screenshot of Podcast for Return of Spring, Onset of WinterAfter all the user may only have a New York minute to locate content related to a work of art before the bus arrives, the light changes or something else redirects the user’s attention.

cultureNOW is a non-profit which collaborates with Public Art Organizations throughout the country.  So with this app you can also access works located in several other city’s.  Their website has a map to give you an idea of how many works of art are currently in their database in which cities.  “CultureNOW is powered by a network of professionals—scholars, artists, architects, urban planners, educators, curators, historians and New York City specialists—who generously volunteer their time and expertise”. So, if after using this app you too are inspired to contribute content please be sure to contact them. In this context that handy “Contact” item in the center of the tab bar makes perfect sense.

cultureNOW: Guidebook for the Museum Without Walls is $1.99 on Apple’s App Store and worth every penny and more (I like that the information menu includes a donate option with a link to the cultureNOW website). Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later and requires internet access in order to access the database. cultureNOW also has an app focused on Lower Manattan which has 6 walking tours, 70 podcasts, and covers about 1000 sites and is available for free on Apple’s App Store.  Additionally, cultureNOW has 240+ free podcasts available on the iTunes Store if one wanted to download these to an iPod classic or nano.

Here’s a humorous video on the cultureNOW app:

Why Visit? 3 iPhone Apps for Historic Places

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Let me confess up front that I have a weak spot for apps that focus on local historic areas.  These are like someone inviting you into their home. This is where they live and work. There’s an element of pride based upon a true appreciation for a place that shines through the best of these apps. Even if it’s unlikely you’ll be able to make the physical journey to everyone one of these, the best historic places apps create a soft spot in your heart that you don’t forget by taking you on a mental journey. Let’s begin with a warm invitation to the Strawbery Banke Museum.

The Strawbery Banke Museum

App icon for Strawbery BankeMuseumRated Four StarsHave you seen the travel book series “Why Stop?” such as this one for Texas. Each book covers the historical markers in a state so that as you drive across the state you can read about the markers on your route and choose to stop at the ones that interest you or in reading about them become more informed about the places you are traveling through.  Perusing through the App Store the first question an app developer for a historic place answers is “why stop?”. Why stop and spend time with this app and then why stop and visit the historic place with which it is associated.

For me the above video answers the first question for this wonderful app developed by John Forti, Curator of Historic Landscape, in partnership with Audissey Guides (too bad the App Store doesn’t allow the embedding of videos in the app description) and this very well developed app answers the second question. After spending time with this app I really do want to visit the Strawbery Banke Museum one day.

Located in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, “Strawbery Banke today is unique among outdoor history museums – tracing 375 years of history in one of America’s oldest continuously occupied neighborhoods. The 10-acre site, with its authentically restored houses and shops, period gardens, and costumed role players, presents the daily lives of ordinary people who lived here – from Colonial times to World War II, from the mundane to the elegant, from economic boom to war time austerity – in engaging and accessible ways. Strawbery Banke Museum is a capsule of New England seaport life across four centuries.” (from the museum’s website).

Screenshot of Strawbery Banke map with 29 stops identified

Touch screen map with 29 stops

Navigating the Strawbery Banke app is super easy and intuitive.  From the “Home” screen tap “Property Map” and you are taken to an interactive map of the museum’s ten acres.  I really appreciate this design because including this interactive map is not only useful for the onsite visitor but also draws in the app visitor to the place. If however, you prefer a list view simply tap “Sites”. Tap stop #1 and there is an brief introductory video that invites the viewer “to come discover your place in the unfolding story of America”. This welcome is a nice touch that some apps skip. Tapping on each of the 29 stops takes the user to a screen with 1-3 videos to choose from. The variety of voices and the accompanying musical score really  do a good job of bringing user into the museum grounds. Strawbery Banke comes alive as historical pictures and illustrations are interspersed with pictures of the contemporary space.

After spending time with this app the user really feels like you’ve visited someplace. And someplace you want to return to again and again to discover the little gems provided in each stop. Tapping “Visitor Info” on the “Home” screen takes the user to a screen with links for “Events”, “Hours & Admission”, “Directions” and “About this Application”.  Overall an uncluttered navigation design. The only thing missing is any integration with social networks or the possibility to email links to the video clips to friends which I was tempted to do on the one on “Victorian Children’s Garden” in which the listener is encourage to think of encouraging the children you know to have their own garden to tend.

The Strawbery Banke Museum app is available for free from Apple’s App Store and well worth checking out. It is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad and requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Chester: Revealing The Rows

App icon for Chester: Revealing the Rows

Rated Two StarsLocated about forty minutes south of Liverpool in the UK is the town of Chester which, in partnership with Imagemakers , has incorporated the children’s game of i-spy into a stroll through historic Chester.  The Rows are a system of covered walkways that run through the fronts of buildings and are found on the four main streets of Chester. This app is a game where participants try to spot one of thirty different objects from the city motto of “Aniqui Colant Aintiquum Dierum” (Let the Ancients Worship the Ancient of Days) to the marking on a building of “1274 AD” for when King Edward I of England used Chester as a base to attack the Welsh.  As the app says, “Not great for the Welsh, but good for business in the Rows!”. Each of the thirty items are assigned a point value from two to ten points each and up to four people can play together.  The thirty objects are divided into three themes: “Ancient shopping mall”, “2000 years of history” and “People and places”. In order to “spot” all thirty objects in the game one must play the game three times, each time choosing a different theme.

Screenshot of The Hand

Screenshot of "The Hand"

A list view displays the ten objects in the theme the players are trying to spot and tapping on each takes the user to a screen such as the one to the right for “The Hand”. Tapping “Look” on this screen results in a full screen view of the object. Tapping “Map” displays a map of the Rows with the location of the object.  “More” simply means in this case a more complete description of the objects significance to the history of Chester.  Once the object is spotted the user taps “Seen it”.  Modest in its ambitions this app is an interesting example of leveraging the game model to increase one’s knowledge a historical area.

Chester: Revealing the Rows incorporates no multimedia which is a shame. Although playing around with this app does not inspire me to visit historic Chester it does give me a brief appreciation for its place in history. Mostly though I kept wondering what it might be like to merge this app with the next one in today’s post: DigiMacq.

Chester: Revealing the Rows is a free app and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad and requires iOS 3.0 or later.

DigiMacq

App icon for DigiMacq

Rated Three StarsFor our next historical places app we’re going down under to Parramatta in The Heart of Greater Western Sydney (as this video by the Parramatta City Council is entitled).  DigiMacq is the app as history channel focusing on the historic centre of Parramatta.  Six beautifully produced vignettes take the viewer on a journey into the past with oral narratives reflecting historical sources and actors playing the roles of the central characters in the drama of the cities early history.  This app is entertaining but frustrating.  It’s the first app I’ve come across in some time that forces the user to follow the tour lock step from start to finish.  And I do mean in lock step. The user is given no navigation options to move around in any order other than the one designed. This app may or may not be designed primarily for grade school children (I’m waiting on confirmation from the developer) but it has the feel of a DVD being played in a grade school history class.  However, I wonder if it would appeal to today’s children.

As I mentioned in the review on Chester: Revealing the Rows I really kept imagining blending these two apps.  Take the production value of DigiMacq with its beautifully crafted multimedia narratives and combine that with Chester’s three themes and game playing model and I could see a much more engaging app than either of these two individually are.

Screenshot of Parramatta Park

Screenshot of Stop #1Parramatta Park

Don’t link to social media if you don’t have a follow up plan in place.

When you finish the multimedia tour you are invited to take a survey (but the link doesn’t lead to a survey only to SurveyPirate where you can create your own survey).  Additionally the user is provided a link for DigiMacq’s Facebook Page where we read that “the DigiMacq Facebook page has been set up as so users from all around the world can discuss their experience and meet other DigiMacq users!”.  Sounds like a plan however, the two most recent post on the wall are spam and there are no discussions in the discussions tab.  Follow the link to “follow the DigiMacq journey on Twitter” and you find a hand full of tweets from months ago.  It seems like the developers had good intentions for incorporating social media into the experience but it seems to have fallen short. I’ve reached out to the developers to find out what happened here and will update this if I’m successful in reaching them.

DigiMacq is a free app available on Apple’s App Store and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

10 New Culture Apps for the iPhone

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November saw the release of a number of culture apps on the Apple App Store. Some were as alive as a business card or flyer but others were very creative, fun and inspiring in their approach to engaging users in this space. Here is a review of ten culture apps which give a representative range of the releases from cultural institutions in the month of November.

App icon for Ancient Egyptian Book of the DeadRated Two Stars1. Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead

Does your heart weigh more than the feather of truth? Answer 7 questions correctly and you will unlock the Book of the Dead of Hunefer, one of the many of the British Museum’s collection of Books of the Dead featured in the the exhibition Journey through the Afterlife: Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead. Get the answers wrong, and you will be eaten by the Great Devourer.

This app is more of a trailer for the exhibit than an app for engaging in the exhibition. If you are planning to attend the exhibition (which runs through March 6, 2011) and have children then the app journey through the netherworld may be a good teaser to get them intrigued. (Rated for children 9+ for infrequent/mild horror/fear themes).

Given the apps trailer premise my one suggestion would be for the “Events programme” page to be integrated in an easy to read format for the iPhone. Instead one is directed to the exhibition website which while I do appreciate the link it is a bit more difficult to navigate than if this information had been integrated into the app itself.

Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead is a free app compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad and requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

App icon for BristolRated Three Stars2. Bristol: The Blitz and the City We Lost

Bristol was the fifth most heavily bombed British city of World War II. The presence of Bristol Harbour and the Bristol Aeroplane Company made it a target for bombing by the Nazi German Luftwaffe who were able to trace a course up the River Avon from Avonmouth using reflected moonlight on the waters into the heart of the city.[1]
Between 24 November 1940 and 11 April 1941 there were six major bombing raids. In total Bristol received 548 air raid alerts and 77 air raids with:
919 tons of high-explosive bombs and myriad incendiary bombs
1299 people killed, 1303 seriously injured, 697 rescued from debris
89,080 buildings damaged including 81,830 houses destroyed and over 3000 later demolished.(From the Bristol Blizt in Wikipedia).

This app gives you information on what old Bristol was like, and the effect the Blitz had, through an engaging audio commentary, and using archive photos and film provided by Bristol Record Office, and other pictures from Bristol City Museum & Art Gallery.

Bristol: The Blitz and the City We Lost is a step up from a basic audio tour and something I am seeing pop up on the App Store for many historical areas throughout the world. If you are in Bristol the app uses the phone’s GPS to play the right audio clips, and show the right archive images and films in the right places as you walk around Bristol’s old city. But for the rest of us there is browse option which I enjoyed. Two things are missing from the browse option: a map of Bristol to help locate visually how the different stops relate spatially; and also, there are no present day photographs of the stops given the design for a walking tour. All in all though I found the app an informative and easy to use bit of history.

Bristol: The Blitz and the City We Lost is $2.99 on the App Store and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.
App icon for Extraordinary HeroesRated Two Stars3. Extraordinary Heroes

The Imperial War Museum London opened the Lord Ashcroft Gallery, its first major permanent gallery in ten years, on the 12th of November with Extraordinary Heroes.

The new gallery, paid for by a £5million donation from Lord Ashcroft, KCMG, will house the Extraordinary Heroes exhibition containing the world’s largest collection of Victoria Crosses (VCs), which has been established by Lord Ashcroft since 1986. The 162 awards, which range from the Crimean to the Falklands wars, are on public display for the first time alongside 48 VCs and 31 George Crosses (GCs) already held by the Museum. The VC is Britain and the Commonwealth’s premier award for extreme gallantry in the face of the enemy, while the GC is Britain’s most prestigious civil decoration.

The Extraordinary Heroes app which accompanies the exhibit indicates that one can “explore 29 stories of bravery across 7 different themes” but it does so in the manner of a fancy flyer for the exhibition. One can read the brief descriptions but one doesn’t feel really drawn into the stories. On the “How to Use This App” screen there are icons and instructions for audio and video clips but it appears that this is from Toura’s (the developer) template, rather than specific to Extraordinary Heroes, as there are no audio or video clips available in the app. Which is a shame. After Bristol: The Blitz I was geared up for more history but found Extraordinary Heroes to be less than ordinary as an app. This is a step down from an audio guide.

Extraordinary Heroes is available for $0.99 on the App Store. Save your change unless you want to make a charitable donation to the Imperial War Museum. Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.
App icon for Golden Gate Park Field GuideRated Four Stars4. Golden Gate Park Field Guide

This is a really cool app from the California Academy of Sciences and let me start by noting the coolest feature, “Sightings”. With “Sightings” “citizen scientist” can search for recent sightings of plants and animals in the park. For example, a Red-shouldered Hawk (Buteo lineatus) was spotted on the grassy slope between deYoung and JFK on Thanksgiving day. Users can also upload a spotting with a picture. Unfortunately the picture of the Red-shouldered Hawk wasn’t the best and you can’t zoom yet on the picture but this is still a pretty cool way to explore the park. However, the field guide tells me that this is an uncommon sighting and even provides an audio clip of the Red-shouldered Hawk’s voice. The app also keeps track of your sightings in folder for handy reference.

A field guide highlights more than 170 of the park’s animal and plant species, “including a few surprises like wild coyotes and blackberry bushes“. An “Adventures” section includes two nature walks, two bike tours, and four scavenger hunts. This app is well thought out and easy to navigate.

The Golden Gate Park iPhone app is currently free for a limited time and then will be $2.99. If you are planning to visit the California Academy of Sciences in the coming weeks show the app at the Academy ticket window for $5 off the price of your ticket from 11/29/10-12/24/10. (Valid for up to four guests.) This app is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

App icon for MasadaRated Two Stars5. Acoustiguide Smartour – Masada

“On the cliff of Masada, at the edge of the Judean Mountains, rising over 400 meters above the western shore of the Dead Sea, unfolded one of the most dramatic events in the history of the people of Israel.

When all hope of halting the advance of the Roman forces was lost, Elazar Ben-Yair gathered the warriors of Masada, with their women, their elderly and their young in the square beyond the wall and addressed them, calling upon them to take their own lives…

“…and die we shall ere we serve our enemies in bondage, and free men we shall remain when we leave the land of the living, we, our wives and our children…’ ” (from the developer’s description)

This app from Acoustiguide is pretty much one would expect from a leading provider of audio guides. There are 41 way points and an introduction. Each is accompanied by a still photograph. I had been hoping that there would be more multi-media available to really bring Masada to the user who may not be able to visit. While this audioguide is informative it seems to fall short of really being an app. I wish this app would take a page or two from the National Constitution Center’s app.

Acoustiguide Smartour – Masada is $1.99 on Apple’s App Store and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.
App icon for Mori Art MuseumRated One Star6. Mori Art Museum Official App

The Mori Art Museum “is Tokyo’s highest museum, on the 53rd floor of the Roppongi Hills Mori Tower. Opened in 2003, it features state-of-the-art galleries with 6m-tall (20-ft.) ceilings, controlled natural lighting, and great views of Tokyo. Innovative exhibitions of emerging and established artists from around the world are shown four times a year, with past shows centering on contemporary Asian, African, and Japanese art.” (from the New York Times).

The Mori Art Museum Official App is the app as business card. There is basic information about the current exhibit, “Odani Motohiko: Phantom Limb” including biographical information about the artist and pictures of six pieces in the exhibition. There is no additional audio or video included. I’m not sure I understand the point of creating this app other than, as I said, as a business card. Odani Motohiko’s art looks intriguing but this app isn’t going to help the user gain a better appreciation of his work.

Mori Art Museum Official App is available on Apple’s App Store at no charge and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.2 or later.

App icon for National Constitution CenterRated Four Stars7. National Constitution Center

The National Constitution Center worked with Drexel University’s School of Education to create this excellent app. There are five navigation icons across the bottom of the app. The first icon, “Home”, provides the visitor with basic logistical information including directions via public transportation and parking rates. Let’s skip the second icon for a second. The central icon appropriately enough is of the “Constitution” and provides a full text of this historic document. The fourth icon is “Newswire” provided by YellowBrix, Inc. a service of BusinessWire. The newsire highlights articles in the news which affect constitutional issues, although not all articles seem to meet this criteria. And the fifth navigation icon is “More” which allows the user to send an email about the app, provide feedback to the NCC or take a survey.

Now back to the second icon, “Tours”, which is the heart of this app. Here the NCC introduces an in-app payment system which I applaud. There are four tours, “Art of the American Soldier”, “We the People-Constitution”, “Signer’s Hall Exhibit”, and “Ancient Rome and America”. Each tour has between twenty and forty-five waypoints and includes rich media. For example, a video of George W.H. Bush, Chairman of the NCC, welcomes the user to Signers’ Hall. After a couple of provided preview way points the user can choose to purchase the rest of the tour for $0.99. A very reasonable price considering the content provided here. If the NCC had started with the app being priced at $3.99 on the App Store users might be reluctant to purchase the app. With this model users can download the app and have convenient access to some basic features and then pay-as-you-go with the tours after you’ve previewed the content of several waypoints first.

Overall I think the NCC did a good job of creating an app that is engaging both for the on-site visitor and the at-home app user. I haven’t visited the NCC yet but after viewing this app I’m looking forward to the chance to do so soon.

The NCC app is free to download from Apple’s App Store and then charges $0.99 each for four optional tours. Try one and I think you’ll agree you’re getting your moneys worth here. This app is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

App icon for The Phillips CollectionRated Four Stars8. The Phillips Collection

The Phillips Collection has released a very professional app with great features, easy to use navigation and lots of content to explore. The audio guide consist of three tours, “Intersections” with 6 stops, “Permanent Collection” with 9 stops, and “TruthBeauty: Pictorialism and the Photograph as Art 1845-1945” (a current exhibition running through January 9, 2011) with 9 stops. A variety of voices are featured on the audio guide including Museum Director Dorothy Kosinski, artists, curators, and educators. The last time I visited the Phillips Collection the audio guide was available for access via your cell phone, which I find an improvement over many of the audio guide units distributed by museums but still you have to dial the access number repeatedly during a visit which gets old. So having the audio pre-loaded for a visit is certainly an improvement, although some of it seems lifted from a dated audio guide. When I heard curator Vesela Sreteno refer to a work from the “Intersections” series being on view until May 2, 2010 I had to double check to be sure this app had debuted in November.

But the real fun with this app is when you begin exploring the other content available. There’s a veritable treasure trove of videos to get lost exploring with content ranging from behind the scenes views of artists installing their works in the museum to visitors commenting on the recent Georgia O’Keeffe Exhibition Abstraction. There really is so many wonderful surprises in exploring the videos included in this app.

A real gem of a surprise in this app is the “Love Stories from the Phillips Collection”. I haven’t seen anything like this on another museum app and found these stories very touching and really enriched the experience of my time exploring The Phillips Collection app. Do yourself a favor, download this app and take a look at these “Love Stories”.

One other feature which I really appreciate on the Phillips Collection app is the donation icon at the bottom of the app. This reminds me of the glass boxes often found in museum lobbies which provide an opportunity to donate what you wish. The Phillips house recently suffered substantial damage from a fire and so they have launched a micro-donation campaign to allow supporters to contribute to make a $5 donation, by texting “phillips5” to 20222 and to make a $10 donation, they can text “phillips10” to this same number. Even if this donation were not for a special cause I do appreciate that the Phillips Collection provided this way to say thanks for a great app experience.

The Phillips Collection app is available for free from Apple’s App Store and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

App icon for TakeItArtside!Rated Three Stars9. TakeItArtside!

This wonderful app from Central Kentucky’s Museum Without Walls Project represents a collaborative effort between Christine Huskisson of the University of Kentucky department of art, Lisa Broome-Price of the Gaines Center for the Humanities, Allison Hosale, a recent graduate of UK with an MA in Art History, and the direct involvement of students from the University of Kentucky and Georgetown College. The design of the app really encourages user involvement with the public art in Lexington, Kentucky. A user can browse a map of public artworks in the Lexington, Kentucky, follow directions on a Google map to the artwork and check-in to earn points (naturally, you need to be in the area for this to work). A “My Gallery” folder allows users to keep track of which art works they have visited. As a result of the check-in feature the Museum Without Walls “team will be able to track which pieces of artwork are being viewed the most and at what times and even by certain demographics, because each user will create a small profile that will give a little information about themselves,” according to Brian Raney of Apex Software, who partnered on the app development.

Museum Without Walls has even created a page for lesson plans. The lesson plans were created by Allison Hosale as part of a graduate level assignment and tested in a local elementary school.

The only thing missing currently is audio and I read that there are plans to include audio from “artists and interpretive comments from curators and administrators, as well as those who might simply want to share their experiences”.

TakeItArtside! is a free app available from Apple’s App Store and is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

UPDATE December 6, 2010: The Project Team at Central Kentucky Museum Without Walls informs me that the lessons plans for the current app were designed by Sarah Piester & Jeanette Tesmer, graduate students at the University of Kentucky.

App icon for ZahnerRated Two Stars10. Zahner

Zahner has produced, what in it’s present form is, the app as digital portfolio. This pioneer in the architectural metal industry has collaborated with an impressive list of clients all over the world.

According to their website, “The Zahner iPhone App was designed to give art and architecture lovers a taste of the great works by great artists. Included in the App are many of the best designers, architects, and artists of our day, showing the works they’ve produced in Zahner metal.
The Zahner App is one of the best ways to get a taste for the projects that Zahner has done around the world. The Zahner App includes several mapped locations so that users can visit Zahner projects completed in their own area. There is no better way to understand the quality of Zahner metal-work than by seeing it in person.”

The app as it is now does include hundreds of photos and the resources section contains interesting and useful articles however, the app itself is missing a pulse. There’s no video or audio from the artists and architects. No commentary from Zahner on their processes. Nothing. Just a silent digital portfolio of admittedly impressive work. Check out the video on their website for a demo of the app.

Zahner’s app is available for free from Apple’s App Store. I’d recommend waiting until they add some more engaging content. This app is compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later

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